Is There Still Solidarity In Europe?

henningAccording to new research undertaken by the Open Society Foundations there still is:

Despite the different challenges facing European nations, the large majority of Europeans believe that standing in solidarity and working together is the best way of getting out of the current crises facing the continent. Two thirds (67 percent) of Europeans surveyed say countries in Europe must show solidarity and work together in order to tackle current economic and social challenges. In sharp contrast, only a third (33 percent) of Europeans believe countries should prioritize national self-interests instead.

But, as you might expect following the development of the Eurozone crisis over recent years, this solidarity is under fundamental threat as the research director also warned about:

“As our interdependence becomes ever clearer, more and more Europeans realise that we will only get out of this crisis together, not apart,” commented Jordi Vaquer, director of the Open Society Initiative for Europe. “But this solidarity is in real danger of being permanently undermined. Our research also shows that 85 percent of Europeans surveyed feel that European unity and solidarity has been severely or permanently damaged by the economic crisis.”

One thing is blatantly clear: without maintaing European solidarity and expanding mutual understanding we have absolutely no chance of keeping the Euro and the European integration project on track in the long run. And solidarity is not political talk but action on the ground. The crisis affects real people, we have to show solidarity with real people. The work being done by Solidarity Now is therefore really commendable! Nice campaign video too.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/hZdfJpQjm2k]

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  • Ian Young

    Not just Eurozone problems undermining solidarity but the practice of Germany with its ‘mini jobs’ policy, which denies minimum standards and a minimum wage, is a worrying in development in a large high productivity economy. I would expect no better from David Cameron but even he is yet to tear up minimum wage leglislation.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22080862